Nature preserve http://dudubluelagoon.com/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 00:26:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://dudubluelagoon.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-11-120x120.png Nature preserve http://dudubluelagoon.com/ 32 32 Huge boulders at Dunn’s Mountain Nature Preserve North Carolina https://dudubluelagoon.com/huge-boulders-at-dunns-mountain-nature-preserve-north-carolina/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 22:59:32 +0000 https://dudubluelagoon.com/huge-boulders-at-dunns-mountain-nature-preserve-north-carolina/ There’s a rock quarry-turned-nature preserve in North Carolina that’s surprisingly impressive. Consisting of 83 acres, Dunn’s Mountain Nature and History Preserve is a nature preserve as well as a historic site with huge rounded boulders that are plutonic in nature. The park itself features an old rock quarry and tons […]]]>




There’s a rock quarry-turned-nature preserve in North Carolina that’s surprisingly impressive. Consisting of 83 acres, Dunn’s Mountain Nature and History Preserve is a nature preserve as well as a historic site with huge rounded boulders that are plutonic in nature. The park itself features an old rock quarry and tons of granite outcrops that cover the surface of the mountain like icing on a cake.

Next time you’re looking for a fun way to explore the Tar Heel State, check out this nature preserve in North Carolina. Dunn’s Mountain Nature and History Preserve is open year-round – however, it is only open on designated weekends. Check the website for updated weekend dates and hours of operation.

If you want to fit this cool attraction into a fun half-day road trip, keep reading This rural road trip will take you to some of North Carolina’s best hidden countryside gems for the perfect little road trip that all of family can enjoy.

Address: 1740 Dunns Mountain Road, Salisbury, North Carolina 28146, USA

]]>
Nature reserve added to regional park properties https://dudubluelagoon.com/nature-reserve-added-to-regional-park-properties/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 10:26:31 +0000 https://dudubluelagoon.com/nature-reserve-added-to-regional-park-properties/ On September 15, officials from the Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority (NOVA Parks) and the Winkler Botanical Preserve held a ceremony marking the incorporation of the 44.6-acre nature preserve in Alexandria’s West End into the system regional parks. As part of the transfer agreement, the Winkler organization is providing NOVA Parks with $1 million for […]]]>

On September 15, officials from the Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority (NOVA Parks) and the Winkler Botanical Preserve held a ceremony marking the incorporation of the 44.6-acre nature preserve in Alexandria’s West End into the system regional parks.

As part of the transfer agreement, the Winkler organization is providing NOVA Parks with $1 million for capital needs and more than $3 million as an operating endowment to support educational programs on the reserve and integrate new improvements. Additionally, the Winkler organization is offering the Alexandria City Government $1 million to advance community engagement and learning resources.

In partnership with the municipal government, new environmental education programs will be developed for school groups, and once-popular summer camps will return to the site.

“A generation of young people from Alexandria, including my two children, have enjoyed the outdoors at Winkler Botanical Preserve,” said Alexandria Mayor Justin Wilson. “We are deeply grateful for the generosity of the Winkler Organization in ensuring the accessibility of this natural space for generations to come.”

The Winkler Botanical Reserve – which includes streams, a pond, a waterfall, and trails – was established in 1979 to protect natural space in the rapidly urbanizing Alexandria. The reserve, located at 5400 Roanoke Ave., was created by Catherine Winkler Herman, a passionate philanthropist and environmentalist, in memory of her late husband, real estate developer Mark Winkler, and was designed by their daughter, landscape architect Tori Winkler Thomas, as a place to protect native plants such as swamp rose mallow and wildlife such as ospreys and hawks.

Tori Winkler Thomas also led the reserves for more than 25 years before his retirement. The log reserve’s distinctive headquarters, Catherine’s Lodge, has long served as the center for the environmental education programs Ms. Thomas designed and oversaw.

“The enormity of this gift cannot be overstated. The vision of Catherine Winkler Herman and the genius of Tori Winkler have created an unprecedented botanical oasis within our highly urbanized Northern Virginia,” said Cate Magennis Wyatt, President of the regional park authority.

Founded in 1959, NOVA Parks, with its newest addition, now operates 35 parks with 12,380 acres of parkland.

]]>
Hiker discovers body of dead woman at Fort Myers Beach Nature Preserve https://dudubluelagoon.com/hiker-discovers-body-of-dead-woman-at-fort-myers-beach-nature-preserve/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 04:35:00 +0000 https://dudubluelagoon.com/hiker-discovers-body-of-dead-woman-at-fort-myers-beach-nature-preserve/ FORT MYERS BEACH, Fla. (WBBH) – The body of a dead woman was discovered early Monday morning at a Fort Myers Beach nature preserve. The Lee County Sheriff’s Office told NBC2 that the body of a deceased woman was found by a hiker who was hiking a nature trail in the Matanzas Pass Reservation around […]]]>

FORT MYERS BEACH, Fla. (WBBH) – The body of a dead woman was discovered early Monday morning at a Fort Myers Beach nature preserve.

The Lee County Sheriff’s Office told NBC2 that the body of a deceased woman was found by a hiker who was hiking a nature trail in the Matanzas Pass Reservation around 8 a.m. on Labor Day.

“It’s just awful,” said Cindy Komanowski, who is visiting the island from Tampa. “Here in this park, and there are houses right there.”

Neighbors who live along the entrance to the nature reserve told NBC2 that deputies were focusing their investigation on the edge of the pond near the entrance to the reserve.

“This morning we went to the beach, and there was a line, and there was the police,” said Ens Keaasmin, who is on vacation near the reserve. “We asked what happened, and they said it was an investigation.”

According to witnesses, the investigators blocked the street in front of the reserve.

“We didn’t know it was a corpse or anything like that,” Keaasmin said.

The sheriff’s office is still working to identify the woman who was found. Detectives say his death is currently not being deemed suspicious. However, until all questions are answered, some will be uninsured.

“No. I mean a little, but it’s still very sad, and it makes me wonder what happened,” Mary Penza said.

Count on NBC2 for the latest updates on this developing story.

]]>
BREAKING: Forever Wild expands Turkey Creek Nature Preserve to 170 acres https://dudubluelagoon.com/breaking-forever-wild-expands-turkey-creek-nature-preserve-to-170-acres/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 16:03:19 +0000 https://dudubluelagoon.com/breaking-forever-wild-expands-turkey-creek-nature-preserve-to-170-acres/ Beautiful Turkey Creek. (Bham now) Good news, nature fans – the Forever Wild Land Trust has expanded Turkey Creek Nature Reserve by 170 acres. According to the State Land Division of the Alabama State Department of Conservation and Natural Resources and the Southern Environmental Center, the new addition was recently purchased. This increases the total […]]]>
Beautiful Turkey Creek. (Bham now)

Good news, nature fans – the Forever Wild Land Trust has expanded Turkey Creek Nature Reserve by 170 acres. According to the State Land Division of the Alabama State Department of Conservation and Natural Resources and the Southern Environmental Center, the new addition was recently purchased. This increases the total area of ​​the reserve from 485 acres to 655. Read on to get the scoop.

Expansion

The 170-acre park addition shares a 3,000-foot property line with the existing Turkey Creek Nature Preserve Forever Wild area.

This new addition is significant because it protects more land around the existing preserve, which is home to many federally protected species and has the potential to expand recreational opportunities in one of Forever Wild’s most visited areas. .

Where is the new addition?

The new addition is located west of the Turkey Creek area and west of Narrows Road.

While the borders have always extended on this side of the road, there has not been enough room to create opportunities for public access. Now, with the new addition available, it will be possible.

What the expansion means for Turkey Creek

Birmingham Alabama
Charles Yeager of Turkey Creek. (Pat Byington / Bham Now)

Charles Yeager of Turkey Creek Nature Preserve told us about the positive impact the new addition will have. Here is some:

1. It will protect the wooded slopes above Turkey Creek.

Turkey Creek is home to a number of rare and endangered species, including:

  • 4 endangered fish species (another soon to be listed)
  • 2 endangered bats
  • 1 endangered turtle

By protecting the forested slopes above Turkey Creek, water quality and animals will also be protected.

2. It will present unique opportunities for forest management.

If possible, it is possible to plant and manage the new addition for montane longleaf pine. This is a rare habitat that is important to the state’s ecosystem.

3. The park will be able to expand its network of trails to meet the growing needs of its visitors.

“Prior to this addition, we had made the most of the territory’s 485 acres by adding over 5.5 miles of trail, including 3.2 miles of single-lane multi-use bike path. While these trails are well used and enjoyed, the most common request from hikers and cyclists is for more.

Charles Yeager, Turkey Creek Nature Preserve

Can’t wait to take advantage of the park’s new trail network?

Stream Turkey
Turkey stream. (Bham now)

Be patient, it will take time. Forever Wild will first need to develop a management plan.

“Before we can open this area to public access, we will work with State Lands to develop a management plan for the tract. We will have to assess parking, barriers and develop the trail network. It may take a few years to do this and get the necessary funding to implement it properly. »

Charles Yeager, Turkey Creek Nature Preserve

How you can help

Want Turkey Creek Nature Preserve to continue to thrive? While the addition of the park will help meet growing demands for access to public green spaces, this is only possible with continued local and national support.

Here’s how you can help:

For more Birmingham news, follow Bham Now on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, TikTok + LinkedIn.

]]>
September Events to Honor Davidson Arabia Mountain Nature Preserve’s Anniversary – https://dudubluelagoon.com/september-events-to-honor-davidson-arabia-mountain-nature-preserves-anniversary/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 13:18:39 +0000 https://dudubluelagoon.com/september-events-to-honor-davidson-arabia-mountain-nature-preserves-anniversary/ The Arabia Mountain Heritage Area Alliance is hosting events throughout September to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Davidson Arabia Mountain Nature Reserve. According to officials from the Arabia Mountain Heritage Area Alliance (AMHAA), although the federally recognized heritage area covers 40,000 acres and encompasses many historic and natural sites, Arabia Mountain is the most easily […]]]>

The Arabia Mountain Heritage Area Alliance is hosting events throughout September to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Davidson Arabia Mountain Nature Reserve.

According to officials from the Arabia Mountain Heritage Area Alliance (AMHAA), although the federally recognized heritage area covers 40,000 acres and encompasses many historic and natural sites, Arabia Mountain is the most easily identifiable landscape. of the region.

“The mountain itself is part of the 2,550-acre green space in DeKalb County called the Davidson-Arabia Nature Preserve,” the AMHAA website states. “The reserve also includes other large exposed granite formations, wetlands, pine and oak forests, several streams and two lakes. The rare species of native plants, such as the characteristic red diamorpha in winter and yellow daisies in autumn, give the impression that the rock is constantly changing.

Fifty years ago, Charles Davidson, Jr., then president of one of the largest granite products companies in the world, made the decision to prevent a massive mountain of granite owned by the Davidson family from being developed by one of the company’s competitors and donated it to the DeKalb County government to be preserved as a public green space, a news release said.

The preservation of Arabia Mountain’s monadnock, defined as an isolated hill of bedrock rising above the general level of the surrounding area, has paved the way for public bike paths and hiking trails so the public can continue to enjoy the unique landscape of the region.

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the reserve, the public is invited to attend the following events:

• The festivities will begin with a guided sunset/full moon hike with a ranger who will discuss the history of the area. The event will run from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. on September 9.
• The Georgia Conservancy will honor the 50th anniversary of Davidson-Arabia Mountain Nature Preserve by hosting a service project. “Projects we plan to address during our service day include trail maintenance and restoration, as well as the removal of invasive plant species,” Georgia Conservancy officials said. Volunteers are asked to bring water, snacks, hiking shoes, long pants, and a raincoat. The service day will run from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on September 24. For more information and to register for this event, visit www.georgiaconservancy.org/npld-service-projects.
• An outing with some of those who helped create and continue to support the Davidson Arabia Mountain Nature Reserve will take place during the 50th Anniversary Founder’s Day Hike. The event will run from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. on September 25.
• The DeKalb County Department of Recreation, Parks and Cultural Affairs and the Arabia Mountain Heritage Area Alliance will hold a ceremony celebrating the origin of the Davidson-Arabia Mountains Nature Preserve. The public is invited to join county officials, parks staff, the Davidson family and representatives of the Arabia Mountain Area Alliance at the ceremony and light refreshments will be served, according to the news release. The event will run from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. on September 28.

Davidson Arabia Mountain Nature Reserve is located at 3787 Klondike Road in Stonecrest. For more information, visit https://arabiaalliance.org/.

2,242 total views, no views today

]]>
Watch the sunset over Lake Renwick, an Illinois nature preserve https://dudubluelagoon.com/watch-the-sunset-over-lake-renwick-an-illinois-nature-preserve/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 23:03:45 +0000 https://dudubluelagoon.com/watch-the-sunset-over-lake-renwick-an-illinois-nature-preserve/ Posted in Illinois Nature September 01, 2022 by Jennifer All over the country – from open rural landscapes to dramatic mountain peaks, desert dunes, island shores and everything in between – one can find truly spectacular sunsets. The evening’s vibrant and dramatic performances have inspired poets, couples and adventurers for […]]]>



All over the country – from open rural landscapes to dramatic mountain peaks, desert dunes, island shores and everything in between – one can find truly spectacular sunsets. The evening’s vibrant and dramatic performances have inspired poets, couples and adventurers for ages. Now they now fill our feeds with wanderlust photos and invite explorers to exciting new vantage points. The Prairie State might not be a priority when most people think of where to find the best sunsets in the country, but we’re pretty proud of it! For an unexpected spot to bask in some of Illinois’ most beautiful sunset angles, Lake Renwick Nature Preserve has all the dreamy color, natural beauty, and peace and quiet you could ask for.

Please note that while Renwick Lake Nature Reserve is open year-round, the colony area is closed except for guided tours during nesting season. Keep an eye on the Lake Renwick Nature Reserve Facebook page for updates and times.

We are so lucky to have so many nature reserves in our state and so much diverse natural beauty to explore! Where is your favorite place to enjoy an Illinois sunset?

Looking for more unexpected things to do in the Prairie State? Check out some of our favorite nature centers in Illinois. Or how about a road trip to some of the best hidden gems in the Illinois countryside?

Address: Lake Renwick, Plainfield, IL 60544, USA

]]>
A petroglyph artist leaves his mark on a Phippsburg nature preserve https://dudubluelagoon.com/a-petroglyph-artist-leaves-his-mark-on-a-phippsburg-nature-preserve/ Mon, 29 Aug 2022 22:05:16 +0000 https://dudubluelagoon.com/a-petroglyph-artist-leaves-his-mark-on-a-phippsburg-nature-preserve/ By Susan ConleyPhotographed by Benjamin WilliamsonExcerpt from our September 2022 issue Artist Kevin Sudeith stood beside a long, high ledge of greyish feldspar and milky quartz in the Phippsburg Land Trust’s Ridgewell Preserve, perhaps 300 yards along a narrow spur from the main trail. Kevin Sudeith was staring at a life-size Great Blue Heron, which […]]]>
By Susan Conley
Photographed by Benjamin Williamson
Excerpt from our September 2022 issue

Artist Kevin Sudeith stood beside a long, high ledge of greyish feldspar and milky quartz in the Phippsburg Land Trust’s Ridgewell Preserve, perhaps 300 yards along a narrow spur from the main trail. Kevin Sudeith was staring at a life-size Great Blue Heron, which he had recently carved in low relief in the mottled stone. His meticulous rendering of the bird makes him feel almost alive, his variegated four-foot wingspan captured in mid-flight. “It’s all about the feathers,” he noted.

For tens of thousands of years, and probably longer, humans have left petroglyphs – from Latin Petra (“rock”) and the Greek glyph (“sculpture”) – scattered across the landscape. The oldest known examples in Maine were carved along Machias Bay several thousand years ago. For much of his adult life, 56-year-old Sudeith was a painter, exhibiting in galleries in San Francisco and New York. Then, 15 years ago, he carved a large petroglyph on Manhattan’s Upper East Side: bicycles he saw passing by, planes he watched fly overhead. After that, he got hooked. He had found a way to create works of art that could live on their own terms – “independent of the gatekeepers and whims of the art world”, he said. The sculptures could find their own audience and would exist for thousands of years. He began to travel the world, going from rock to rock, from North Dakota to California to the Eastfjords of Iceland.

When he begins a petroglyph, he composes the design on the rock with chalk, then makes several detailed drawings on paper, which he later transfers to the rock. To carve the shallow relief without disturbing the surrounding surface, he uses diamond composite rotating disc saws that can cut just about anything. He chose the Phippsburg site partly because it was not far from his wife’s family home in Georgetown, but more specifically because of the pleasantly shaded knoll around the ledge and because the sheer size of the stone allowed him to do something that would feel epic. . He approached the Phippsburg Land Trust, who gave his blessing, and he got to work three years ago.

His goal with petroglyphs is, generally, to create an environmental portrait of a place at a given time – a halibut in Cape Breton, an ancient lake sturgeon in Michigan, a horseshoe crab in the Rockaways. In Phippsburg, Center Pond and Ridgewell Preserves, he focused on birds: common eiders, belted kingfisher, tree swallow, red-winged blackbird, loon, hermit thrush, cardinal North, etc. Using an ancient art form, Sudeith wanted to depict the ecosystem of Phippsburg as it is today. “They are what is here now. Will there still be eiders and herons here in 1000 years? he wondered. “Who knows?”

Walking along the dirt road, passing the heron and the swallow, he came to a sculpture of another type of aircraft: NASA’s Ingenuity helicopter, which flies around Mars from the last year. Sudeith believes space exploration is humanity’s most exciting ongoing endeavor. Elsewhere during his travels, he sculpted the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, and several space shuttles. He is always looking for the perfect rock on which to sculpt a life-size astronaut.

In Phippsburg, the Ingenuity is steps from the eider duck, which is next to a series of elementary-looking concentric circles that might as well be remnants of prehistoric times. It’s Stone Age meets Space Age, under a canopy of pine trees in the Maine woods. Sudeith’s hope? That the sculptures create an overarching narrative about the mystery and wonders of the world, or as he puts it, “about things that cannot be said in words.”

Kevin Sudeith leads a free walking tour of his petroglyphs Sept. 1, starting at Phippsburg’s Center Pond Preserve parking lot on Parker Head Rd., about half a mile after leaving Rte. 209.


BUY THIS ISSUE

]]>
Hike through the shoreline woods at this CT Coastal Nature Preserve https://dudubluelagoon.com/hike-through-the-shoreline-woods-at-this-ct-coastal-nature-preserve/ Thu, 04 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://dudubluelagoon.com/hike-through-the-shoreline-woods-at-this-ct-coastal-nature-preserve/ More than 200 years ago, Simon Smith stood high on a hill and surveyed the ledges overlooking Long Island Sound. The perfection he saw in the granite cliffs led him to open a quarry and build a stone house on the shores of Smith Cove. From this simple opening, an era of quarrying in East […]]]>

More than 200 years ago, Simon Smith stood high on a hill and surveyed the ledges overlooking Long Island Sound. The perfection he saw in the granite cliffs led him to open a quarry and build a stone house on the shores of Smith Cove. From this simple opening, an era of quarrying in East Lyme began and sent pink granite across the country.

I stood over a pile of quarry residue and ran my finger over centuries-old chisel marks in a block of granite, easily imagining teams of men toiling on the ledges of what is now Oswegatchie Hills Nature Preserve. A loop trail marked with yellow blazes brought me to the top of Mount Tabor, at the northern edge of the reserve and quarry abandoned for over a century.

The 457-acre preserve, one of the largest tracts of open space along Connecticut’s highly developed coastline, is a rare piece of coastal forest on the Niantic River that opened to the public in 2007. is to extend the reserve to over 700 acres along an impressive contiguous open space running north to south between East Lyme and Waterford.

A teepee built of branches.

Pierre Marteka

Visitors to the reserve can explore approximately seven miles of trails through two hills separated by a deep hollow. The trails parallel the scenic lily-covered Clark Pond and a deep forest of oak and pitch pine dotted with dozens of glacial erratics. But you may have to wait until the leaves are cleared from the trees to see any water, with a pair of lookouts in the reserve blocked by leaves during the summer and early fall.

Glacial erratics dot the reserve.

Glacial erratics dot the reserve.

Pierre Marteka

With multiple ways to explore the reserve, I’ve created a loop that hits all eight “points of interest” including a view of the pond, rock cave, and granite quarry. The trails are clearly marked and easy to follow with “you are here” maps on the trees and letters of the alphabet marking trail junctions.

All trails wind along the shores of Clark’s man-made pond, though the red blaze-marked trail offers hikers the most scenic views of the water. The pond was created so that fishing vessels could have ice in their hulls to preserve their catch. There are several short side trails leading to views overlooking the sparkling pond, and when I visited, a pair of huge snapping turtles were basking in the sun on a large lake.

A couple of snapping turtles sun themselves on a rock in the middle of Clark Pond.

A couple of snapping turtles sun themselves on a rock in the middle of Clark Pond.

Pierre Marteka

The red trails on the west side of the pond include a side path leading to a view of a wetland from atop a ridge, a pit filled with white quartz, and a small cave created by a pile of boulders. Young hikers will have fun weaving between the rocks and exiting on the other side. The woods are filled with mountain laurel, the state flower.

A white quartz pit is found along the blue trail.

A white quartz pit is found along the blue trail.

Pierre Marteka

At 243 feet, Mount Tabor is the highest point on the preserve and offers views of the Niantic River, Long Island Sound, and Fishers Island. The top of the hill is populated mostly by scrub oaks, blueberries, and pitch pines that are just high enough to create the dreaded “Seasonal View” designation. But it also gives you an excuse to come back in late fall or during winter and early spring to see the view.

An abandoned quarry is located along the yellow loop trail.

An abandoned quarry is located along the yellow loop trail.

Pierre Marteka

The Mount Tabor Loop Trail also passes through the abandoned Smith Quarry. This is where I spent much of my time exploring the piles of square granite blocks with chisel marks and drill holes. Flat rocks and ledges are also a great place for a picnic. According to the trail guide, teams of oxen or horses dragged the granite up Quarry Dock Road to barges to transport it to places like Grand Central Station where it was used in the foundation. “Over the next century, granite would be mined from this quarry and loaded onto barges from a quay built of granite blocks on the Niantic River, for shipment to construction sites across the country,” according to the East Lyme Historical Society.

The trail guide notes that the reserve is “ideally suited for a wide variety of passive recreational activities” and is a “truly unique and beautiful place”. That’s absolutely true, but mark your calendar to return in late fall, winter, or early spring for a hike to the top of Mount Tabor to fully experience Oswegatchie Hills.

What’s in a name?

I wish we knew! While “Oswegatchie” is generally believed to come from the Iroquois language, the translation has been lost to history. That hasn’t stopped the debate over its meaning, with theories flying around for at least a century and a half. Also, the name has been used for the location of Connecticut since the late 19th century, but no one seems to know precisely why, as it’s a name that has its roots in a place in upstate New York. .


Oswegatchie Hills Nature Preserve, East of Lyme

The bottom line: The 457-acre Oswegatchie Hills Nature Reserve stretches along two major rocky ridges featuring coastal forest that helps protect the Niantic River estuary between East Lyme and Waterford.

Difficulty level: Easy to moderate

Total mileage: About 7 miles

Directions: Take I-95 to Exit 74 and Route 161 south to Oswegatchie Hills Road and Veterans’ Memorial Park. A map kiosk at the reserve trailhead will help you plan your trip. Go to oswhills.org for a color map of the reserve.

Accepted animals ? Dogs on a leash are allowed and must be cleaned up afterwards.

Nearby activities

Niantic Children’s Museum: Here you’ll find an interactive, hands-on, and educational place for kids “to try out new roles, let their imaginations run wild, and feel safe as they explore the world around them.” The 5,000 square foot museum has outdoor play space, and almost everything is wheelchair accessible. There’s a discovery room and science activities, and kids can pilot a fishing boat, play as an architect with giant foam blocks, and ride a fire truck. There is also a “toddler land”, a tree house, a whale drum, a climbing wall and a zipline. 409 Main St., Niantic, 860-691-1111

Lilian’s Coffee: This American bistro serves an “eclectic mix” of fresh, local, organic and gluten-free ingredients “in a bright and cozy atmosphere”. The cafe notes that “food is at the center of unique preparations” and ever-changing menu items and specialties, from crispy Point Judith calamari to wild Alaskan salmon tacos to homemade falafel. A raw sea bass includes a modest selection of native oysters. There is a full service bar and restaurant on the outdoor terrace. 374 Main St., Niantic, 860-739-2233

Niantic Bay Boardwalk: The boardwalk is 1.8 miles long and runs along the Long Island Sound from Cini Park and the railroad bridge on the east to Hole-in-the-Wall Beach on the east. ‘west. There is free parking at each end. The eastern half passes by a beach and crosses dunes. There are plenty of benches along the way to sit and rest. The western half passes along the stone breakwater. Visitors can return to the boardwalk or explore the shops and restaurants along Main Street.


]]>
Opinion: Denver needs to become a city within a nature preserve https://dudubluelagoon.com/opinion-denver-needs-to-become-a-city-within-a-nature-preserve/ Sun, 31 Jul 2022 13:36:20 +0000 https://dudubluelagoon.com/opinion-denver-needs-to-become-a-city-within-a-nature-preserve/ Has Denver lost its mojo? This is a question we explored in our July 20 dossier. Since then, we’ve received many responses, as well as thoughtful suggestions on how the Mile High City can regain its mojo. Here is one of them: That cities are a “concrete jungle” is a fairly common complaint in the […]]]>
Has Denver lost its mojo? This is a question we explored in our July 20 dossier. Since then, we’ve received many responses, as well as thoughtful suggestions on how the Mile High City can regain its mojo. Here is one of them:

That cities are a “concrete jungle” is a fairly common complaint in the modern world, often backed up by the observation that it is possible – if one wishes – to go through life encountering nothing “natural”. “except for the occasional puddle of mud. We are here, nature is “there”. We have succeeded in the millennial quest of previous generations to separate human culture from the adjacent wilderness, or so we often think.

But nature does not agree. Imagine the Great Plains as a boundless sea, with the foothills as the dunes of the western shore. In a real seaside, it is intuitive that the waters [should be] vibrant with marine life, and the cliff tops and dunes of life in this biome – but in between, trapped in the waves, is a rough, rocky strand that, at first glance, may seem not just lifeless, but inhospitable. Yet tidal pools are not duds, but dynamic ecosystems in their own right, perhaps even more robust than either of the larger adjacent ecosystems. A city can, by analogy, be considered from this same perspective. Urban development is a set of constraints imposed on a pre-existing set of habitats, much like a landslide filling a lush valley of rough rocks. But with time and opportunity, nature will imbue the reshaped landscape with an array of creatures and plants suited to the new reality.

The city manages 6,000 acres of parks and more than eighty kilometers of trails (much more than both, if you count the metro as a whole), but nature doesn’t stop at the edge of a park. . Cemeteries, yards, backyards, street trees, and even golf courses can all be found just as vibrant – if we step back and let them.

Of the 514 bird species documented to be present in the state, about 400 have been recorded in the metro area, and many appear to be part of their normal annual routines, with perhaps a hundred of those nesting locally. Cavity-nesting birds – normally associated with the canopy of mature trees – can be found downtown, although they are in lower numbers than in other more “natural” parts of town, such as a park . (For context, a bird feeder in the area is about 40 species; the other 90% of the species are here for other reasons.)

The coyote can be found or heard in every neighborhood, the beaver should be expected wherever there is moving water, and the notoriously shy bobcat lair in the developed metropolitan area. We’re no strangers to deer or bears, and even the occasional elk or mountain lion barely registers surprise in us.

A USDA survey several years ago recorded over 500 species of plants (excluding flower beds and window boxes), a number that is likely double if we slide our border to include all that lies inside the 470 loop. For context, a survey of the High Line Canal commissioned by New Conservation found not quite 500 plant species just within the canal footprint, not including adjacent neighborhoods and open spaces, and there is very good reason to believe that every insect and vertebrate species could also be found along its full length.

Nature may be sneaky, but she’s not absent. It’s been said to the point of cliche in years past that Denver is a city in a park, and the sentiment isn’t wrong, though I’d say it’s incomplete. Denver is – or rather, could be – a city on a nature preserve, if we let it. An urban jungle, if you will, that happens to have concrete instead of rocks. Awareness is the first step to pride and hopefully a rejuvenated mojo. Go out and enjoy!

Kenyon Moon works with Urban Bird, a southeast Denver boutique that looks at urban areas as ecosystems and challenges the sense that nature is “incidental” in cities; it encourages people to experience urban areas as a series of interconnected social and ecological networks rather than the “islands” we often perceive due to access to these areas through a series of parking lots and traffic lanes.

Westword.com frequently publishes essays and opinion pieces on topics of interest to the metropolitan community. Do you have one you would like to share? Send it to [email protected] And watch for more mojo responses in the next print edition of Westword.

]]>
Huge New Bronze Age Fortress Discovered In Ireland’s Nature Reserve! https://dudubluelagoon.com/huge-new-bronze-age-fortress-discovered-in-irelands-nature-reserve/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 13:57:33 +0000 https://dudubluelagoon.com/huge-new-bronze-age-fortress-discovered-in-irelands-nature-reserve/ While carrying out routine fieldwork in the Burren Lowlands of County Galway in Ireland, field archaeologist Michael Gibbons discovered a Bronze Age fortress that may be nearly 3,200 years old . The vast ancient rock fortress is about 1,300 feet (400 meters) long on its north and south sides and about 328 feet (100 meters) […]]]>

While carrying out routine fieldwork in the Burren Lowlands of County Galway in Ireland, field archaeologist Michael Gibbons discovered a Bronze Age fortress that may be nearly 3,200 years old . The vast ancient rock fortress is about 1,300 feet (400 meters) long on its north and south sides and about 328 feet (100 meters) along its east and west walls. Ireland’s last Bronze Age fortress is bounded on all sides by turloughs, a type of seasonal lake found only in Ireland west of the River Shannon. The bogs were completely dry some of the time and filled with water other times. When filled with water, they could form a virtually impenetrable barrier.

It is clear that the location of the Irish Bronze Age fortress was carefully chosen by its architects, who wanted to make the structure as difficult as possible for enemies to reach.

When he made this fascinating discovery, Gibbons was working on an assignment for Project Muintearas. This is an educational initiative dedicated to protecting and preserving the traditional language, society and culture of the Irish-speaking areas of Ireland.

The remains of the nearly forested Bronze Age Irish fortress recently discovered by field archaeologist Michael Gibbons in County Galway, Ireland. ( TEN News )

Hidden in an ordinary site: a gigantic Bronze Age fortress!

The gigantic structure that Michael Gibbons analyzed and eventually identified had in fact been known for some time. The fortress sits within the boundaries of Coole Park, a 1,000-acre (four square kilometre) nature reserve located a short distance from the town of Gort in County Galway.

Ireland’s last Bronze Age fortress was easy to identify as a structure of some type, but its antiquity was unknown and so it had not aroused as much interest among archaeologists and historians.

But Gibbons was intrigued enough to take a closer look at the stone structure, and the results of his investigation suggested it was built between 1200 and 800 BC.

Gibbons told RTE News that the large rock enclosure was comparable in size to the famous fortress of Dún Aonghasa on Inis Mhór in the Aran Islands, which mark the entrance to Galway Bay in the North Atlantic. He said the fortress would have been large enough to house and protect up to 200 people.

There’s a “magical otherworldly quality to the whole landscape,” Gibbons said.

Much of the land surrounding the newly identified Bronze Age fortress is covered in dense forest, and the forest has grown quite high within the walls of the structure. However, Gibbons and his colleagues plan to continue to explore the interior spaces of the fortress intensively over the next few months, looking in particular for the crumbling ruins of the Bronze Age rotundas.

To complement their on-the-ground analysis, the researchers have so far conducted several aerial surveys of the structure and surrounding area with LiDAR technology. This innovative exploration tool uses reflected laser light to construct three-dimensional recreations of sections of the earth photographed from above.

“We know there were many roundhouses inside, that they work metal and make high-level artifacts,” Gibbons told online publication ARTnews. The archaeologist is currently waiting for the accumulated LiDAR data to be fully analyzed, and he and his fellow researchers hope this will provide evidence that several roundhouses were built inside the fortress ramparts.

Round houses were the preferred form of dwelling for most people who lived in the lands of the United Kingdom during the Bronze Age (2500-500 BC) and for some time beyond. These strong, low structures included walls made of wooden or stone posts installed in pre-dug post holes. Bronze Age builders filled the spaces between the inner and outer sections of the walls with a mixture of earth, clay and twigs, to insulate the living space against cold and damp. The round houses were covered with thatched roofs which allowed smoke from cooking or heating fires to escape easily.

Round houses were not always built within fortress walls. It seems that the people who lived in the Bronze Age fortress built at Coole Park were afraid of outside invaders and probably felt they had no choice but to lock themselves behind the rocky walls of a large defensive wall.

The stone outline of the huge Irish Bronze Age fortress built in Coole Park is clearly visible between the turlough lakes.  (RTE News)

The stone outline of the huge Irish Bronze Age fortress built in Coole Park is clearly visible between the turlough lakes. ( TEN News )

A magical landscape to discover

Muintearas CEO Seán Ó Coistealbha expressed his delight at Gibbons’ unique discovery.

“The amount of work that was put into this incredible fortress by men and women in ancient times is incredible,” Ó Coistealbha told RTE. “There is a wealth yet to be discovered. We are only skirting the stone borders of a hidden civilisation, or a hidden population, or a hidden time in Ireland’s past.”

Explorations in the area around the fortress are likely to resume as archaeologists now know that a Bronze Age fortress and settlement existed at the site between 2,800 and 3,200 years ago. For now, they can only guess how far the Bronze Age inhabitants ventured beyond the fortress walls, but it’s likely that many more ruins and artifacts will eventually be excavated or identified in this small part of County Galway’s magical landscape.

Top image: Field archaeologist Michael Gibbons, left, unearthed the outlines of this gigantic Bronze Age fortress, partially visible in the background of this image, which may be nearly 3,200 years old , during routine field work in a nature reserve in County Galway. , Ireland . Source: YouTube screenshot / TEN News

By Nathan Falde

]]>